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2020


3D Morphable Face Models - Past, Present and Future
3D Morphable Face Models - Past, Present and Future

Egger, B., Smith, W. A. P., Tewari, A., Wuhrer, S., Zollhoefer, M., Beeler, T., Bernard, F., Bolkart, T., Kortylewski, A., Romdhani, S., Theobalt, C., Blanz, V., Vetter, T.

ACM Transactions on Graphics, September 2020 (article)

Abstract
In this paper, we provide a detailed survey of 3D Morphable Face Models over the 20 years since they were first proposed. The challenges in building and applying these models, namely capture, modeling, image formation, and image analysis, are still active research topics, and we review the state-of-the-art in each of these areas. We also look ahead, identifying unsolved challenges, proposing directions for future research and highlighting the broad range of current and future applications.

project page pdf preprint [BibTex]

2020

project page pdf preprint [BibTex]


Learning to Dress 3D People in Generative Clothing
Learning to Dress 3D People in Generative Clothing

Ma, Q., Yang, J., Ranjan, A., Pujades, S., Pons-Moll, G., Tang, S., Black, M. J.

In Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), June 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Three-dimensional human body models are widely used in the analysis of human pose and motion. Existing models, however, are learned from minimally-clothed 3D scans and thus do not generalize to the complexity of dressed people in common images and videos. Additionally, current models lack the expressive power needed to represent the complex non-linear geometry of pose-dependent clothing shape. To address this, we learn a generative 3D mesh model of clothed people from 3D scans with varying pose and clothing. Specifically, we train a conditional Mesh-VAE-GAN to learn the clothing deformation from the SMPL body model, making clothing an additional term on SMPL. Our model is conditioned on both pose and clothing type, giving the ability to draw samples of clothing to dress different body shapes in a variety of styles and poses. To preserve wrinkle detail, our Mesh-VAE-GAN extends patchwise discriminators to 3D meshes. Our model, named CAPE, represents global shape and fine local structure, effectively extending the SMPL body model to clothing. To our knowledge, this is the first generative model that directly dresses 3D human body meshes and generalizes to different poses.

arxiv project page [BibTex]


{GENTEL : GENerating Training data Efficiently for Learning to segment medical images}
GENTEL : GENerating Training data Efficiently for Learning to segment medical images

Thakur, R. P., Rocamora, S. P., Goel, L., Pohmann, R., Machann, J., Black, M. J.

Congrès Reconnaissance des Formes, Image, Apprentissage et Perception (RFAIP), June 2020 (conference)

Abstract
Accurately segmenting MRI images is crucial for many clinical applications. However, manually segmenting images with accurate pixel precision is a tedious and time consuming task. In this paper we present a simple, yet effective method to improve the efficiency of the image segmentation process. We propose to transform the image annotation task into a binary choice task. We start by using classical image processing algorithms with different parameter values to generate multiple, different segmentation masks for each input MRI image. Then, instead of segmenting the pixels of the images, the user only needs to decide whether a segmentation is acceptable or not. This method allows us to efficiently obtain high quality segmentations with minor human intervention. With the selected segmentations, we train a state-of-the-art neural network model. For the evaluation, we use a second MRI dataset (1.5T Dataset), acquired with a different protocol and containing annotations. We show that the trained network i) is able to automatically segment cases where none of the classical methods obtain a high quality result ; ii) generalizes to the second MRI dataset, which was acquired with a different protocol and was never seen at training time ; and iii) enables detection of miss-annotations in this second dataset. Quantitatively, the trained network obtains very good results: DICE score - mean 0.98, median 0.99- and Hausdorff distance (in pixels) - mean 4.7, median 2.0-.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Generating 3D People in Scenes without People
Generating 3D People in Scenes without People

Zhang, Y., Hassan, M., Neumann, H., Black, M. J., Tang, S.

In Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), June 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a fully automatic system that takes a 3D scene and generates plausible 3D human bodies that are posed naturally in that 3D scene. Given a 3D scene without people, humans can easily imagine how people could interact with the scene and the objects in it. However, this is a challenging task for a computer as solving it requires that (1) the generated human bodies to be semantically plausible within the 3D environment (e.g. people sitting on the sofa or cooking near the stove), and (2) the generated human-scene interaction to be physically feasible such that the human body and scene do not interpenetrate while, at the same time, body-scene contact supports physical interactions. To that end, we make use of the surface-based 3D human model SMPL-X. We first train a conditional variational autoencoder to predict semantically plausible 3D human poses conditioned on latent scene representations, then we further refine the generated 3D bodies using scene constraints to enforce feasible physical interaction. We show that our approach is able to synthesize realistic and expressive 3D human bodies that naturally interact with 3D environment. We perform extensive experiments demonstrating that our generative framework compares favorably with existing methods, both qualitatively and quantitatively. We believe that our scene-conditioned 3D human generation pipeline will be useful for numerous applications; e.g. to generate training data for human pose estimation, in video games and in VR/AR. Our project page for data and code can be seen at: \url{https://vlg.inf.ethz.ch/projects/PSI/}.

Code PDF [BibTex]

Code PDF [BibTex]


Learning Physics-guided Face Relighting under Directional Light
Learning Physics-guided Face Relighting under Directional Light

Nestmeyer, T., Lalonde, J., Matthews, I., Lehrmann, A. M.

In Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, IEEE/CVF, June 2020 (inproceedings) Accepted

Abstract
Relighting is an essential step in realistically transferring objects from a captured image into another environment. For example, authentic telepresence in Augmented Reality requires faces to be displayed and relit consistent with the observer's scene lighting. We investigate end-to-end deep learning architectures that both de-light and relight an image of a human face. Our model decomposes the input image into intrinsic components according to a diffuse physics-based image formation model. We enable non-diffuse effects including cast shadows and specular highlights by predicting a residual correction to the diffuse render. To train and evaluate our model, we collected a portrait database of 21 subjects with various expressions and poses. Each sample is captured in a controlled light stage setup with 32 individual light sources. Our method creates precise and believable relighting results and generalizes to complex illumination conditions and challenging poses, including when the subject is not looking straight at the camera.

Paper [BibTex]

Paper [BibTex]


{VIBE}: Video Inference for Human Body Pose and Shape Estimation
VIBE: Video Inference for Human Body Pose and Shape Estimation

Kocabas, M., Athanasiou, N., Black, M. J.

In Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), June 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Human motion is fundamental to understanding behavior. Despite progress on single-image 3D pose and shape estimation, existing video-based state-of-the-art methodsfail to produce accurate and natural motion sequences due to a lack of ground-truth 3D motion data for training. To address this problem, we propose “Video Inference for Body Pose and Shape Estimation” (VIBE), which makes use of an existing large-scale motion capture dataset (AMASS) together with unpaired, in-the-wild, 2D keypoint annotations. Our key novelty is an adversarial learning framework that leverages AMASS to discriminate between real human motions and those produced by our temporal pose and shape regression networks. We define a temporal network architecture and show that adversarial training, at the sequence level, produces kinematically plausible motion sequences without in-the-wild ground-truth 3D labels. We perform extensive experimentation to analyze the importance of motion and demonstrate the effectiveness of VIBE on challenging 3D pose estimation datasets, achieving state-of-the-art performance. Code and pretrained models are available at https://github.com/mkocabas/VIBE

arXiv code [BibTex]

arXiv code [BibTex]


General Movement Assessment from videos of computed {3D} infant body models is equally effective compared to conventional {RGB} Video rating
General Movement Assessment from videos of computed 3D infant body models is equally effective compared to conventional RGB Video rating

Schroeder, S., Hesse, N., Weinberger, R., Tacke, U., Gerstl, L., Hilgendorff, A., Heinen, F., Arens, M., Bodensteiner, C., Dijkstra, L. J., Pujades, S., Black, M., Hadders-Algra, M.

Early Human Development, 144, May 2020 (article)

Abstract
Background: General Movement Assessment (GMA) is a powerful tool to predict Cerebral Palsy (CP). Yet, GMA requires substantial training hampering its implementation in clinical routine. This inspired a world-wide quest for automated GMA. Aim: To test whether a low-cost, marker-less system for three-dimensional motion capture from RGB depth sequences using a whole body infant model may serve as the basis for automated GMA. Study design: Clinical case study at an academic neurodevelopmental outpatient clinic. Subjects: Twenty-nine high-risk infants were recruited and assessed at their clinical follow-up at 2-4 month corrected age (CA). Their neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed regularly up to 12-31 months CA. Outcome measures: GMA according to Hadders-Algra by a masked GMA-expert of conventional and computed 3D body model (“SMIL motion”) videos of the same GMs. Agreement between both GMAs was assessed, and sensitivity and specificity of both methods to predict CP at ≥12 months CA. Results: The agreement of the two GMA ratings was substantial, with κ=0.66 for the classification of definitely abnormal (DA) GMs and an ICC of 0.887 (95% CI 0.762;0.947) for a more detailed GM-scoring. Five children were diagnosed with CP (four bilateral, one unilateral CP). The GMs of the child with unilateral CP were twice rated as mildly abnormal. DA-ratings of both videos predicted bilateral CP well: sensitivity 75% and 100%, specificity 88% and 92% for conventional and SMIL motion videos, respectively. Conclusions: Our computed infant 3D full body model is an attractive starting point for automated GMA in infants at risk of CP.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Learning Multi-Human Optical Flow
Learning Multi-Human Optical Flow

Ranjan, A., Hoffmann, D. T., Tzionas, D., Tang, S., Romero, J., Black, M. J.

International Journal of Computer Vision (IJCV), (128):873-890, April 2020 (article)

Abstract
The optical flow of humans is well known to be useful for the analysis of human action. Recent optical flow methods focus on training deep networks to approach the problem. However, the training data used by them does not cover the domain of human motion. Therefore, we develop a dataset of multi-human optical flow and train optical flow networks on this dataset. We use a 3D model of the human body and motion capture data to synthesize realistic flow fields in both single-and multi-person images. We then train optical flow networks to estimate human flow fields from pairs of images. We demonstrate that our trained networks are more accurate than a wide range of top methods on held-out test data and that they can generalize well to real image sequences. The code, trained models and the dataset are available for research.

Paper Publisher Version poster link (url) DOI [BibTex]


From Variational to Deterministic Autoencoders
From Variational to Deterministic Autoencoders

Ghosh*, P., Sajjadi*, M. S. M., Vergari, A., Black, M. J., Schölkopf, B.

8th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR) , April 2020, *equal contribution (conference) Accepted

Abstract
Variational Autoencoders (VAEs) provide a theoretically-backed framework for deep generative models. However, they often produce “blurry” images, which is linked to their training objective. Sampling in the most popular implementation, the Gaussian VAE, can be interpreted as simply injecting noise to the input of a deterministic decoder. In practice, this simply enforces a smooth latent space structure. We challenge the adoption of the full VAE framework on this specific point in favor of a simpler, deterministic one. Specifically, we investigate how substituting stochasticity with other explicit and implicit regularization schemes can lead to a meaningful latent space without having to force it to conform to an arbitrarily chosen prior. To retrieve a generative mechanism for sampling new data points, we propose to employ an efficient ex-post density estimation step that can be readily adopted both for the proposed deterministic autoencoders as well as to improve sample quality of existing VAEs. We show in a rigorous empirical study that regularized deterministic autoencoding achieves state-of-the-art sample quality on the common MNIST, CIFAR-10 and CelebA datasets.

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


Chained Representation Cycling: Learning to Estimate 3D Human Pose and Shape by Cycling Between Representations
Chained Representation Cycling: Learning to Estimate 3D Human Pose and Shape by Cycling Between Representations

Rueegg, N., Lassner, C., Black, M. J., Schindler, K.

In Thirty-Fourth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-20), Febuary 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of many computer vision systems is to transform image pixels into 3D representations. Recent popular models use neural networks to regress directly from pixels to 3D object parameters. Such an approach works well when supervision is available, but in problems like human pose and shape estimation, it is difficult to obtain natural images with 3D ground truth. To go one step further, we propose a new architecture that facilitates unsupervised, or lightly supervised, learning. The idea is to break the problem into a series of transformations between increasingly abstract representations. Each step involves a cycle designed to be learnable without annotated training data, and the chain of cycles delivers the final solution. Specifically, we use 2D body part segments as an intermediate representation that contains enough information to be lifted to 3D, and at the same time is simple enough to be learned in an unsupervised way. We demonstrate the method by learning 3D human pose and shape from un-paired and un-annotated images. We also explore varying amounts of paired data and show that cycling greatly alleviates the need for paired data. While we present results for modeling humans, our formulation is general and can be applied to other vision problems.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


no image
Real Time Trajectory Prediction Using Deep Conditional Generative Models

Gomez-Gonzalez, S., Prokudin, S., Schölkopf, B., Peters, J.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, 5(2):970-976, IEEE, January 2020 (article)

arXiv DOI [BibTex]

2005


Representing cyclic human motion using functional analysis
Representing cyclic human motion using functional analysis

Ormoneit, D., Black, M. J., Hastie, T., Kjellström, H.

Image and Vision Computing, 23(14):1264-1276, December 2005 (article)

Abstract
We present a robust automatic method for modeling cyclic 3D human motion such as walking using motion-capture data. The pose of the body is represented by a time-series of joint angles which are automatically segmented into a sequence of motion cycles. The mean and the principal components of these cycles are computed using a new algorithm that enforces smooth transitions between the cycles by operating in the Fourier domain. Key to this method is its ability to automatically deal with noise and missing data. A learned walking model is then exploited for Bayesian tracking of 3D human motion.

pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]

2005

pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]


A quantitative evaluation of video-based {3D} person tracking
A quantitative evaluation of video-based 3D person tracking

Balan, A. O., Sigal, L., Black, M. J.

In The Second Joint IEEE International Workshop on Visual Surveillance and Performance Evaluation of Tracking and Surveillance, VS-PETS, pages: 349-356, October 2005 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Inferring attentional state and kinematics from motor cortical firing rates
Inferring attentional state and kinematics from motor cortical firing rates

Wood, F., Prabhat, , Donoghue, J. P., Black, M. J.

In Proc. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, pages: 1544-1547, September 2005 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Motor cortical decoding using an autoregressive moving average model
Motor cortical decoding using an autoregressive moving average model

Fisher, J., Black, M. J.

In Proc. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, pages: 1469-1472, September 2005 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Fields of Experts: A framework for learning image priors
Fields of Experts: A framework for learning image priors

Roth, S., Black, M. J.

In IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, 2, pages: 860-867, June 2005 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


A Flow-Based Approach to Vehicle Detection and Background Mosaicking in Airborne Video
A Flow-Based Approach to Vehicle Detection and Background Mosaicking in Airborne Video

Yalcin, H. C. R. B. M. J. H. M.

IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), Video Proceedings,, pages: 1202, 2005 (patent)

YouTube pdf [BibTex]

YouTube pdf [BibTex]


On the spatial statistics of optical flow
On the spatial statistics of optical flow

(Marr Prize, Honorable Mention)

Roth, S., Black, M. J.

In International Conf. on Computer Vision, International Conf. on Computer Vision, pages: 42-49, 2005 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Modeling neural population spiking activity with {Gibbs} distributions
Modeling neural population spiking activity with Gibbs distributions

Wood, F., Roth, S., Black, M. J.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 18, pages: 1537-1544, 2005 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


no image
Energy-based models of motor cortical population activity

Wood, F., Black, M.

Program No. 689.20. 2005 Abstract Viewer/Itinerary Planner, Society for Neuroscience, Washington, DC, 2005 (conference)

abstract [BibTex]

abstract [BibTex]

2002


Inferring hand motion from multi-cell recordings in motor cortex using a {Kalman} filter
Inferring hand motion from multi-cell recordings in motor cortex using a Kalman filter

Wu, W., Black, M. J., Gao, Y., Bienenstock, E., Serruya, M., Donoghue, J. P.

In SAB’02-Workshop on Motor Control in Humans and Robots: On the Interplay of Real Brains and Artificial Devices, pages: 66-73, Edinburgh, Scotland (UK), August 2002 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

2002

pdf [BibTex]


Bayesian Inference of Visual Motion Boundaries
Bayesian Inference of Visual Motion Boundaries

Fleet, D. J., Black, M. J., Nestares, O.

In Exploring Artificial Intelligence in the New Millennium, pages: 139-174, (Editors: Lakemeyer, G. and Nebel, B.), Morgan Kaufmann Pub., July 2002 (incollection)

Abstract
This chapter addresses an open problem in visual motion analysis, the estimation of image motion in the vicinity of occlusion boundaries. With a Bayesian formulation, local image motion is explained in terms of multiple, competing, nonlinear models, including models for smooth (translational) motion and for motion boundaries. The generative model for motion boundaries explicitly encodes the orientation of the boundary, the velocities on either side, the motion of the occluding edge over time, and the appearance/disappearance of pixels at the boundary. We formulate the posterior probability distribution over the models and model parameters, conditioned on the image sequence. Approximate inference is achieved with a combination of tools: A Bayesian filter provides for online computation; factored sampling allows us to represent multimodal non-Gaussian distributions and to propagate beliefs with nonlinear dynamics from one time to the next; and mixture models are used to simplify the computation of joint prediction distributions in the Bayesian filter. To efficiently represent such a high-dimensional space, we also initialize samples using the responses of a low-level motion-discontinuity detector. The basic formulation and computational model provide a general probabilistic framework for motion estimation with multiple, nonlinear models.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


no image
Inferring hand motion from multi-cell recordings in motor cortex using a Kalman filter

Wu, W., Black M., Gao, Y., Bienenstock, E., Serruya, M., Donoghue, J.

Program No. 357.5. 2002 Abstract Viewer/Itinerary Planner, Society for Neuroscience, Washington, DC, 2002, Online (conference)

abstract [BibTex]

abstract [BibTex]


Probabilistic inference of hand motion from neural activity in motor cortex
Probabilistic inference of hand motion from neural activity in motor cortex

Gao, Y., Black, M. J., Bienenstock, E., Shoham, S., Donoghue, J.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 221-228, MIT Press, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Statistical learning and probabilistic inference techniques are used to infer the hand position of a subject from multi-electrode recordings of neural activity in motor cortex. First, an array of electrodes provides train- ing data of neural firing conditioned on hand kinematics. We learn a non- parametric representation of this firing activity using a Bayesian model and rigorously compare it with previous models using cross-validation. Second, we infer a posterior probability distribution over hand motion conditioned on a sequence of neural test data using Bayesian inference. The learned firing models of multiple cells are used to define a non- Gaussian likelihood term which is combined with a prior probability for the kinematics. A particle filtering method is used to represent, update, and propagate the posterior distribution over time. The approach is com- pared with traditional linear filtering methods; the results suggest that it may be appropriate for neural prosthetic applications.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Automatic detection and tracking of human motion with a view-based representation
Automatic detection and tracking of human motion with a view-based representation

Fablet, R., Black, M. J.

In European Conf. on Computer Vision, ECCV 2002, 1, pages: 476-491, LNCS 2353, (Editors: A. Heyden and G. Sparr and M. Nielsen and P. Johansen), Springer-Verlag , 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper proposes a solution for the automatic detection and tracking of human motion in image sequences. Due to the complexity of the human body and its motion, automatic detection of 3D human motion remains an open, and important, problem. Existing approaches for automatic detection and tracking focus on 2D cues and typically exploit object appearance (color distribution, shape) or knowledge of a static background. In contrast, we exploit 2D optical flow information which provides rich descriptive cues, while being independent of object and background appearance. To represent the optical flow patterns of people from arbitrary viewpoints, we develop a novel representation of human motion using low-dimensional spatio-temporal models that are learned using motion capture data of human subjects. In addition to human motion (the foreground) we probabilistically model the motion of generic scenes (the background); these statistical models are defined as Gibbsian fields specified from the first-order derivatives of motion observations. Detection and tracking are posed in a principled Bayesian framework which involves the computation of a posterior probability distribution over the model parameters (i.e., the location and the type of the human motion) given a sequence of optical flow observations. Particle filtering is used to represent and predict this non-Gaussian posterior distribution over time. The model parameters of samples from this distribution are related to the pose parameters of a 3D articulated model (e.g. the approximate joint angles and movement direction). Thus the approach proves suitable for initializing more complex probabilistic models of human motion. As shown by experiments on real image sequences, our method is able to detect and track people under different viewpoints with complex backgrounds.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


A layered motion representation with occlusion and compact spatial support
A layered motion representation with occlusion and compact spatial support

Fleet, D. J., Jepson, A., Black, M. J.

In European Conf. on Computer Vision, ECCV 2002, 1, pages: 692-706, LNCS 2353, (Editors: A. Heyden and G. Sparr and M. Nielsen and P. Johansen), Springer-Verlag , 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We describe a 2.5D layered representation for visual motion analysis. The representation provides a global interpretation of image motion in terms of several spatially localized foreground regions along with a background region. Each of these regions comprises a parametric shape model and a parametric motion model. The representation also contains depth ordering so visibility and occlusion are rightly included in the estimation of the model parameters. Finally, because the number of objects, their positions, shapes and sizes, and their relative depths are all unknown, initial models are drawn from a proposal distribution, and then compared using a penalized likelihood criterion. This allows us to automatically initialize new models, and to compare different depth orderings.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Implicit probabilistic models of human motion for synthesis and tracking
Implicit probabilistic models of human motion for synthesis and tracking

Sidenbladh, H., Black, M. J., Sigal, L.

In European Conf. on Computer Vision, 1, pages: 784-800, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper addresses the problem of probabilistically modeling 3D human motion for synthesis and tracking. Given the high dimensional nature of human motion, learning an explicit probabilistic model from available training data is currently impractical. Instead we exploit methods from texture synthesis that treat images as representing an implicit empirical distribution. These methods replace the problem of representing the probability of a texture pattern with that of searching the training data for similar instances of that pattern. We extend this idea to temporal data representing 3D human motion with a large database of example motions. To make the method useful in practice, we must address the problem of efficient search in a large training set; efficiency is particularly important for tracking. Towards that end, we learn a low dimensional linear model of human motion that is used to structure the example motion database into a binary tree. An approximate probabilistic tree search method exploits the coefficients of this low-dimensional representation and runs in sub-linear time. This probabilistic tree search returns a particular sample human motion with probability approximating the true distribution of human motions in the database. This sampling method is suitable for use with particle filtering techniques and is applied to articulated 3D tracking of humans within a Bayesian framework. Successful tracking results are presented, along with examples of synthesizing human motion using the model.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Robust parameterized component analysis: Theory and applications to {2D} facial modeling
Robust parameterized component analysis: Theory and applications to 2D facial modeling

De la Torre, F., Black, M. J.

In European Conf. on Computer Vision, ECCV 2002, 4, pages: 653-669, LNCS 2353, Springer-Verlag, 2002 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]

1998


Summarization of video-taped presentations: Automatic analysis of motion and gesture
Summarization of video-taped presentations: Automatic analysis of motion and gesture

Ju, S. X., Black, M. J., Minneman, S., Kimber, D.

IEEE Trans. on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, 8(5):686-696, September 1998 (article)

Abstract
This paper presents an automatic system for analyzing and annotating video sequences of technical talks. Our method uses a robust motion estimation technique to detect key frames and segment the video sequence into subsequences containing a single overhead slide. The subsequences are stabilized to remove motion that occurs when the speaker adjusts their slides. Any changes remaining between frames in the stabilized sequences may be due to speaker gestures such as pointing or writing, and we use active contours to automatically track these potential gestures. Given the constrained domain, we define a simple set of actions that can be recognized based on the active contour shape and motion. The recognized actions provide an annotation of the sequence that can be used to access a condensed version of the talk from a Web page.

pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]

1998

pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]


Robust anisotropic diffusion
Robust anisotropic diffusion

Black, M. J., Sapiro, G., Marimont, D., Heeger, D.

IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, 7(3):421-432, March 1998 (article)

Abstract
Relations between anisotropic diffusion and robust statistics are described in this paper. Specifically, we show that anisotropic diffusion can be seen as a robust estimation procedure that estimates a piecewise smooth image from a noisy input image. The edge-stopping; function in the anisotropic diffusion equation is closely related to the error norm and influence function in the robust estimation framework. This connection leads to a new edge-stopping; function based on Tukey's biweight robust estimator that preserves sharper boundaries than previous formulations and improves the automatic stopping of the diffusion. The robust statistical interpretation also provides a means for detecting the boundaries (edges) between the piecewise smooth regions in an image that has been smoothed with anisotropic diffusion. Additionally, we derive a relationship between anisotropic diffusion and regularization with line processes. Adding constraints on the spatial organization of the line processes allows us to develop new anisotropic diffusion equations that result in a qualitative improvement in the continuity of edges

pdf pdf from publisher [BibTex]

pdf pdf from publisher [BibTex]


The Digital Office: Overview
The Digital Office: Overview

Black, M., Berard, F., Jepson, A., Newman, W., Saund, E., Socher, G., Taylor, M.

In AAAI Spring Symposium on Intelligent Environments, pages: 1-6, Stanford, March 1998 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


A framework for modeling appearance change in image sequences
A framework for modeling appearance change in image sequences

Black, M. J., Fleet, D. J., Yacoob, Y.

In Sixth International Conf. on Computer Vision, ICCV’98, pages: 660-667, Mumbai, India, January 1998 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Image "appearance" may change over time due to a variety of causes such as 1) object or camera motion; 2) generic photometric events including variations in illumination (e.g. shadows) and specular reflections; and 3) "iconic changes" which are specific to the objects being viewed and include complex occlusion events and changes in the material properties of the objects. We propose a general framework for representing and recovering these "appearance changes" in an image sequence as a "mixture" of different causes. The approach generalizes previous work on optical flow to provide a richer description of image events and more reliable estimates of image motion.

pdf video [BibTex]

pdf video [BibTex]


Parameterized modeling and recognition of activities
Parameterized modeling and recognition of activities

Yacoob, Y., Black, M. J.

In Sixth International Conf. on Computer Vision, ICCV’98, pages: 120-127, Mumbai, India, January 1998 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A framework for modeling and recognition of temporal activities is proposed. The modeling of sets of exemplar activities is achieved by parameterizing their representation in the form of principal components. Recognition of spatio-temporal variants of modeled activities is achieved by parameterizing the search in the space of admissible transformations that the activities can undergo. Experiments on recognition of articulated and deformable object motion from image motion parameters are presented.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Motion feature detection using steerable flow fields
Motion feature detection using steerable flow fields

Fleet, D. J., Black, M. J., Jepson, A. D.

In IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR-98, pages: 274-281, IEEE, Santa Barbara, CA, 1998 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The estimation and detection of occlusion boundaries and moving bars are important and challenging problems in image sequence analysis. Here, we model such motion features as linear combinations of steerable basis flow fields. These models constrain the interpretation of image motion, and are used in the same way as translational or affine motion models. We estimate the subspace coefficients of the motion feature models directly from spatiotemporal image derivatives using a robust regression method. From the subspace coefficients we detect the presence of a motion feature and solve for the orientation of the feature and the relative velocities of the surfaces. Our method does not require the prior computation of optical flow and recovers accurate estimates of orientation and velocity.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


{PLAYBOT}: A visually-guided robot for physically disabled children
PLAYBOT: A visually-guided robot for physically disabled children

Tsotsos, J. K., Verghese, G., Dickinson, S., Jenkin, M., Jepson, A., Milios, E., Nuflo, F., Stevenson, S., Black, M., Metaxas, D., Culhane, S., Ye, Y., Mann, R.

Image & Vision Computing, Special Issue on Vision for the Disabled, 16(4):275-292, 1998 (article)

Abstract
This paper overviews the PLAYBOT project, a long-term, large-scale research program whose goal is to provide a directable robot which may enable physically disabled children to access and manipulate toys. This domain is the first test domain, but there is nothing inherent in the design of PLAYBOT that prohibits its extension to other tasks. The research is guided by several important goals: vision is the primary sensor; vision is task directed; the robot must be able to visually search its environment; object and event recognition are basic capabilities; environments must be natural and dynamic; users and environments are assumed to be unpredictable; task direction and reactivity must be smoothly integrated; and safety is of high importance. The emphasis of the research has been on vision for the robot this is the most challenging research aspect and the major bottleneck to the development of intelligent robots. Since the control framework is behavior-based, the visual capabilities of PLAYBOT are described in terms of visual behaviors. Many of the components of PLAYBOT are briefly described and several examples of implemented sub-systems are shown. The paper concludes with a description of the current overall system implementation, and a complete example of PLAYBOT performing a simple task.

pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]

pdf pdf from publisher DOI [BibTex]


Visual surveillance of human activity
Visual surveillance of human activity

L. Davis, S. F., Harwood, D., Yacoob, Y., Hariatoglu, I., Black, M.

In Asian Conference on Computer Vision, ACCV, 1998 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


A Probabilistic framework for matching temporal trajectories: Condensation-based recognition of gestures and expressions
A Probabilistic framework for matching temporal trajectories: Condensation-based recognition of gestures and expressions

Black, M. J., Jepson, A. D.

In European Conf. on Computer Vision, ECCV-98, pages: 909-924, Freiburg, Germany, 1998 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


EigenTracking: Robust matching and tracking of articulated objects using a view-based representation
EigenTracking: Robust matching and tracking of articulated objects using a view-based representation

Black, M. J., Jepson, A.

International Journal of Computer Vision, 26(1):63-84, 1998 (article)

Abstract
This paper describes an approach for tracking rigid and articulated objects using a view-based representation. The approach builds on and extends work on eigenspace representations, robust estimation techniques, and parameterized optical flow estimation. First, we note that the least-squares image reconstruction of standard eigenspace techniques has a number of problems and we reformulate the reconstruction problem as one of robust estimation. Second we define a “subspace constancy assumption” that allows us to exploit techniques for parameterized optical flow estimation to simultaneously solve for the view of an object and the affine transformation between the eigenspace and the image. To account for large affine transformations between the eigenspace and the image we define a multi-scale eigenspace representation and a coarse-to-fine matching strategy. Finally, we use these techniques to track objects over long image sequences in which the objects simultaneously undergo both affine image motions and changes of view. In particular we use this “EigenTracking” technique to track and recognize the gestures of a moving hand.

pdf pdf from publisher video [BibTex]


Recognizing temporal trajectories using the {Condensation} algorithm
Recognizing temporal trajectories using the Condensation algorithm

Black, M. J., Jepson, A. D.

In Int. Conf. on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition, pages: 16-21, Nara, Japan, 1998 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Looking at people in action - An overview
Looking at people in action - An overview

Yacoob, Y., Davis, L. S., Black, M., Gavrila, D., Horprasert, T., Morimoto, C.

In Computer Vision for Human–Machine Interaction, (Editors: R. Cipolla and A. Pentland), Cambridge University Press, 1998 (incollection)

publisher site google books [BibTex]

publisher site google books [BibTex]

1997


Robust anisotropic diffusion and sharpening of scalar and vector images
Robust anisotropic diffusion and sharpening of scalar and vector images

Black, M. J., Sapiro, G., Marimont, D., Heeger, D.

In Int. Conf. on Image Processing, ICIP, 1, pages: 263-266, Vol. 1, Santa Barbara, CA, October 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Relations between anisotropic diffusion and robust statistics are described. We show that anisotropic diffusion can be seen as a robust estimation procedure that estimates a piecewise smooth image from a noisy input image. The "edge-stopping" function in the anisotropic diffusion equation is closely related to the error norm and influence function in the robust estimation framework. This connection leads to a new "edge-stopping" function based on Tukey's biweight robust estimator, that preserves sharper boundaries than previous formulations and improves the automatic stopping of the diffusion. The robust statistical interpretation also provides a means for detecting the boundaries (edges) between the piecewise smooth regions in the image. We extend the framework to vector-valued images and show applications to robust image sharpening.

pdf publisher site [BibTex]

1997

pdf publisher site [BibTex]


Robust anisotropic diffusion: Connections between robust statistics, line processing, and anisotropic diffusion
Robust anisotropic diffusion: Connections between robust statistics, line processing, and anisotropic diffusion

Black, M. J., Sapiro, G., Marimont, D., Heeger, D.

In Scale-Space Theory in Computer Vision, Scale-Space’97, pages: 323-326, LNCS 1252, Springer Verlag, Utrecht, the Netherlands, July 1997 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Learning parameterized models of image motion
Learning parameterized models of image motion

Black, M. J., Yacoob, Y., Jepson, A. D., Fleet, D. J.

In IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR-97, pages: 561-567, Puerto Rico, June 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A framework for learning parameterized models of optical flow from image sequences is presented. A class of motions is represented by a set of orthogonal basis flow fields that are computed from a training set using principal component analysis. Many complex image motions can be represented by a linear combination of a small number of these basis flows. The learned motion models may be used for optical flow estimation and for model-based recognition. For optical flow estimation we describe a robust, multi-resolution scheme for directly computing the parameters of the learned flow models from image derivatives. As examples we consider learning motion discontinuities, non-rigid motion of human mouths, and articulated human motion.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Analysis of gesture and action in technical talks for video indexing
Analysis of gesture and action in technical talks for video indexing

Ju, S. X., Black, M. J., Minneman, S., Kimber, D.

In IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, pages: 595-601, CVPR-97, Puerto Rico, June 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, we present an automatic system for analyzing and annotating video sequences of technical talks. Our method uses a robust motion estimation technique to detect key frames and segment the video sequence into subsequences containing a single overhead slide. The subsequences are stabilized to remove motion that occurs when the speaker adjusts their slides. Any changes remaining between frames in the stabilized sequences may be due to speaker gestures such as pointing or writing and we use active contours to automatically track these potential gestures. Given the constrained domain we define a simple ``vocabulary'' of actions which can easily be recognized based on the active contour shape and motion. The recognized actions provide a rich annotation of the sequence that can be used to access a condensed version of the talk from a web page.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Modeling appearance change in image sequences
Modeling appearance change in image sequences

Black, M. J., Yacoob, Y., Fleet, D. J.

In Advances in Visual Form Analysis, pages: 11-20, Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Visual Form, Capri, Italy, May 1997 (inproceedings)

abstract [BibTex]

abstract [BibTex]


Recognizing facial expressions in image sequences using local parameterized models of image motion
Recognizing facial expressions in image sequences using local parameterized models of image motion

Black, M. J., Yacoob, Y.

Int. Journal of Computer Vision, 25(1):23-48, 1997 (article)

Abstract
This paper explores the use of local parametrized models of image motion for recovering and recognizing the non-rigid and articulated motion of human faces. Parametric flow models (for example affine) are popular for estimating motion in rigid scenes. We observe that within local regions in space and time, such models not only accurately model non-rigid facial motions but also provide a concise description of the motion in terms of a small number of parameters. These parameters are intuitively related to the motion of facial features during facial expressions and we show how expressions such as anger, happiness, surprise, fear, disgust, and sadness can be recognized from the local parametric motions in the presence of significant head motion. The motion tracking and expression recognition approach performed with high accuracy in extensive laboratory experiments involving 40 subjects as well as in television and movie sequences.

pdf pdf from publisher abstract video [BibTex]


Recognizing human motion using parameterized models of optical flow
Recognizing human motion using parameterized models of optical flow

Black, M. J., Yacoob, Y., Ju, X. S.

In Motion-Based Recognition, pages: 245-269, (Editors: Mubarak Shah and Ramesh Jain,), Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, MA, 1997 (incollection)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]

1996


Cardboard people: A parameterized model of articulated motion
Cardboard people: A parameterized model of articulated motion

Ju, S. X., Black, M. J., Yacoob, Y.

In 2nd Int. Conf. on Automatic Face- and Gesture-Recognition, pages: 38-44, Killington, Vermont, October 1996 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We extend the work of Black and Yacoob on the tracking and recognition of human facial expressions using parameterized models of optical flow to deal with the articulated motion of human limbs. We define a "cardboard person model" in which a person's limbs are represented by a set of connected planar patches. The parameterized image motion of these patches is constrained to enforce articulated motion and is solved for directly using a robust estimation technique. The recovered motion parameters provide a rich and concise description of the activity that can be used for recognition. We propose a method for performing view-based recognition of human activities from the optical flow parameters that extends previous methods to cope with the cyclical nature of human motion. We illustrate the method with examples of tracking human legs over long image sequences.

pdf [BibTex]

1996

pdf [BibTex]