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2020


Grasping Field: Learning Implicit Representations for Human Grasps
Grasping Field: Learning Implicit Representations for Human Grasps

Karunratanakul, K., Yang, J., Zhang, Y., Black, M., Muandet, K., Tang, S.

In International Conference on 3D Vision (3DV), November 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Robotic grasping of house-hold objects has made remarkable progress in recent years. Yet, human grasps are still difficult to synthesize realistically. There are several key reasons: (1) the human hand has many degrees of freedom (more than robotic manipulators); (2) the synthesized hand should conform to the surface of the object; and (3) it should interact with the object in a semantically and physically plausible manner. To make progress in this direction, we draw inspiration from the recent progress on learning-based implicit representations for 3D object reconstruction. Specifically, we propose an expressive representation for human grasp modelling that is efficient and easy to integrate with deep neural networks. Our insight is that every point in a three-dimensional space can be characterized by the signed distances to the surface of the hand and the object, respectively. Consequently, the hand, the object, and the contact area can be represented by implicit surfaces in a common space, in which the proximity between the hand and the object can be modelled explicitly. We name this 3D to 2D mapping as Grasping Field, parameterize it with a deep neural network, and learn it from data. We demonstrate that the proposed grasping field is an effective and expressive representation for human grasp generation. Specifically, our generative model is able to synthesize high-quality human grasps, given only on a 3D object point cloud. The extensive experiments demonstrate that our generative model compares favorably with a strong baseline and approaches the level of natural human grasps. Furthermore, based on the grasping field representation, we propose a deep network for the challenging task of 3D hand-object interaction reconstruction from a single RGB image. Our method improves the physical plausibility of the hand-object contact reconstruction and achieves comparable performance for 3D hand reconstruction compared to state-of-the-art methods. Our model and code are available for research purpose at https://github.com/korrawe/grasping_field.

pdf arXiv code [BibTex]


{GIF}: Generative Interpretable Faces
GIF: Generative Interpretable Faces

Ghosh, P., Gupta, P. S., Uziel, R., Ranjan, A., Black, M. J., Bolkart, T.

In International Conference on 3D Vision (3DV), November 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Photo-realistic visualization and animation of expressive human faces have been a long standing challenge. 3D face modeling methods provide parametric control but generates unrealistic images, on the other hand, generative 2D models like GANs (Generative Adversarial Networks) output photo-realistic face images, but lack explicit control. Recent methods gain partial control, either by attempting to disentangle different factors in an unsupervised manner, or by adding control post hoc to a pre-trained model. Unconditional GANs, however, may entangle factors that are hard to undo later. We condition our generative model on pre-defined control parameters to encourage disentanglement in the generation process. Specifically, we condition StyleGAN2 on FLAME, a generative 3D face model. While conditioning on FLAME parameters yields unsatisfactory results, we find that conditioning on rendered FLAME geometry and photometric details works well. This gives us a generative 2D face model named GIF (Generative Interpretable Faces) that offers FLAME's parametric control. Here, interpretable refers to the semantic meaning of different parameters. Given FLAME parameters for shape, pose, expressions, parameters for appearance, lighting, and an additional style vector, GIF outputs photo-realistic face images. We perform an AMT based perceptual study to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate how well GIF follows its conditioning. The code, data, and trained model are publicly available for research purposes at http://gif.is.tue.mpg.de

pdf project code [BibTex]

pdf project code [BibTex]


{PLACE}: Proximity Learning of Articulation and Contact in {3D} Environments
PLACE: Proximity Learning of Articulation and Contact in 3D Environments

Zhang, S., Zhang, Y., Ma, Q., Black, M. J., Tang, S.

In International Conference on 3D Vision (3DV), November 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
High fidelity digital 3D environments have been proposed in recent years, however, it remains extremely challenging to automatically equip such environment with realistic human bodies. Existing work utilizes images, depth or semantic maps to represent the scene, and parametric human models to represent 3D bodies. While being straight-forward, their generated human-scene interactions often lack of naturalness and physical plausibility. Our key observation is that humans interact with the world through body-scene contact. To synthesize realistic human-scene interactions, it is essential to effectively represent the physical contact and proximity between the body and the world. To that end, we propose a novel interaction generation method, named PLACE(Proximity Learning of Articulation and Contact in 3D Environments), which explicitly models the proximity between the human body and the 3D scene around it. Specifically, given a set of basis points on a scene mesh, we leverage a conditional variational autoencoder to synthesize the minimum distances from the basis points to the human body surface. The generated proximal relationship exhibits which region of the scene is in contact with the person. Furthermore, based on such synthesized proximity, we are able to effectively obtain expressive 3D human bodies that interact with the 3D scene naturally. Our perceptual study shows that PLACE significantly improves the state-of-the-art method, approaching the realism of real human-scene interaction. We believe our method makes an important step towards the fully automatic synthesis of realistic 3D human bodies in 3D scenes. The code and model are available for research at https://sanweiliti.github.io/PLACE/PLACE.html

pdf arXiv project code [BibTex]

pdf arXiv project code [BibTex]


AirCapRL: Autonomous Aerial Human Motion Capture Using Deep Reinforcement Learning
AirCapRL: Autonomous Aerial Human Motion Capture Using Deep Reinforcement Learning

Tallamraju, R., Saini, N., Bonetto, E., Pabst, M., Liu, Y. T., Black, M., Ahmad, A.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, 5(4):6678 - 6685, IEEE, October 2020, Also accepted and presented in the 2020 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS). (article)

Abstract
In this letter, we introduce a deep reinforcement learning (DRL) based multi-robot formation controller for the task of autonomous aerial human motion capture (MoCap). We focus on vision-based MoCap, where the objective is to estimate the trajectory of body pose, and shape of a single moving person using multiple micro aerial vehicles. State-of-the-art solutions to this problem are based on classical control methods, which depend on hand-crafted system, and observation models. Such models are difficult to derive, and generalize across different systems. Moreover, the non-linearities, and non-convexities of these models lead to sub-optimal controls. In our work, we formulate this problem as a sequential decision making task to achieve the vision-based motion capture objectives, and solve it using a deep neural network-based RL method. We leverage proximal policy optimization (PPO) to train a stochastic decentralized control policy for formation control. The neural network is trained in a parallelized setup in synthetic environments. We performed extensive simulation experiments to validate our approach. Finally, real-robot experiments demonstrate that our policies generalize to real world conditions.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Learning a statistical full spine model from partial observations
Learning a statistical full spine model from partial observations

Meng, D., Keller, M., Boyer, E., Black, M., Pujades, S.

In Shape in Medical Imaging, pages: 122,133, (Editors: Reuter, Martin and Wachinger, Christian and Lombaert, Hervé and Paniagua, Beatriz and Goksel, Orcun and Rekik, Islem), Springer International Publishing, October 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The study of the morphology of the human spine has attracted research attention for its many potential applications, such as image segmentation, bio-mechanics or pathology detection. However, as of today there is no publicly available statistical model of the 3D surface of the full spine. This is mainly due to the lack of openly available 3D data where the full spine is imaged and segmented. In this paper we propose to learn a statistical surface model of the full-spine (7 cervical, 12 thoracic and 5 lumbar vertebrae) from partial and incomplete views of the spine. In order to deal with the partial observations we use probabilistic principal component analysis (PPCA) to learn a surface shape model of the full spine. Quantitative evaluation demonstrates that the obtained model faithfully captures the shape of the population in a low dimensional space and generalizes to left out data. Furthermore, we show that the model faithfully captures the global correlations among the vertebrae shape. Given a partial observation of the spine, i.e. a few vertebrae, the model can predict the shape of unseen vertebrae with a mean error under 3 mm. The full-spine statistical model is trained on the VerSe 2019 public dataset and is publicly made available to the community for non-commercial purposes. (https://gitlab.inria.fr/spine/spine_model)

Gitlab Code PDF DOI [BibTex]

Gitlab Code PDF DOI [BibTex]


STAR: Sparse Trained Articulated Human Body Regressor
STAR: Sparse Trained Articulated Human Body Regressor

Osman, A. A. A., Bolkart, T., Black, M. J.

In European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV) , August 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The SMPL body model is widely used for the estimation, synthesis, and analysis of 3D human pose and shape. While popular, we show that SMPL has several limitations and introduce STAR, which is quantitatively and qualitatively superior to SMPL. First, SMPL has a huge number of parameters resulting from its use of global blend shapes. These dense pose-corrective offsets relate every vertex on the mesh to all the joints in the kinematic tree, capturing spurious long-range correlations. To address this, we define per-joint pose correctives and learn the subset of mesh vertices that are influenced by each joint movement. This sparse formulation results in more realistic deformations and significantly reduces the number of model parameters to 20% of SMPL. When trained on the same data as SMPL, STAR generalizes better despite having many fewer parameters. Second, SMPL factors pose-dependent deformations from body shape while, in reality, people with different shapes deform differently. Consequently, we learn shape-dependent pose-corrective blend shapes that depend on both body pose and BMI. Third, we show that the shape space of SMPL is not rich enough to capture the variation in the human population. We address this by training STAR with an additional 10,000 scans of male and female subjects, and show that this results in better model generalization. STAR is compact, generalizes better to new bodies and is a drop-in replacement for SMPL. STAR is publicly available for research purposes at http://star.is.tue.mpg.de.

Project Page Code Video paper supplemental [BibTex]


3D Morphable Face Models - Past, Present and Future
3D Morphable Face Models - Past, Present and Future

Egger, B., Smith, W. A. P., Tewari, A., Wuhrer, S., Zollhoefer, M., Beeler, T., Bernard, F., Bolkart, T., Kortylewski, A., Romdhani, S., Theobalt, C., Blanz, V., Vetter, T.

ACM Transactions on Graphics, 39(5), August 2020 (article)

Abstract
In this paper, we provide a detailed survey of 3D Morphable Face Models over the 20 years since they were first proposed. The challenges in building and applying these models, namely capture, modeling, image formation, and image analysis, are still active research topics, and we review the state-of-the-art in each of these areas. We also look ahead, identifying unsolved challenges, proposing directions for future research and highlighting the broad range of current and future applications.

project page pdf preprint DOI [BibTex]

project page pdf preprint DOI [BibTex]


Monocular Expressive Body Regression through Body-Driven Attention
Monocular Expressive Body Regression through Body-Driven Attention

Choutas, V., Pavlakos, G., Bolkart, T., Tzionas, D., Black, M. J.

In Computer Vision – ECCV 2020, Springer International Publishing, Cham, August 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
To understand how people look, interact, or perform tasks,we need to quickly and accurately capture their 3D body, face, and hands together from an RGB image. Most existing methods focus only on parts of the body. A few recent approaches reconstruct full expressive 3D humans from images using 3D body models that include the face and hands. These methods are optimization-based and thus slow, prone to local optima, and require 2D keypoints as input. We address these limitations by introducing ExPose (EXpressive POse and Shape rEgression), which directly regresses the body, face, and hands, in SMPL-X format, from an RGB image. This is a hard problem due to the high dimensionality of the body and the lack of expressive training data. Additionally, hands and faces are much smaller than the body, occupying very few image pixels. This makes hand and face estimation hard when body images are downscaled for neural networks. We make three main contributions. First, we account for the lack of training data by curating a dataset of SMPL-X fits on in-the-wild images. Second, we observe that body estimation localizes the face and hands reasonably well. We introduce body-driven attention for face and hand regions in the original image to extract higher-resolution crops that are fed to dedicated refinement modules. Third, these modules exploit part-specific knowledge from existing face and hand-only datasets. ExPose estimates expressive 3D humans more accurately than existing optimization methods at a small fraction of the computational cost. Our data, model and code are available for research at https://expose.is.tue.mpg.de.

code Short video Long video arxiv pdf suppl link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


GRAB: A Dataset of Whole-Body Human Grasping of Objects
GRAB: A Dataset of Whole-Body Human Grasping of Objects

Taheri, O., Ghorbani, N., Black, M. J., Tzionas, D.

In Computer Vision – ECCV 2020, Springer International Publishing, Cham, August 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Training computers to understand, model, and synthesize human grasping requires a rich dataset containing complex 3D object shapes, detailed contact information, hand pose and shape, and the 3D body motion over time. While "grasping" is commonly thought of as a single hand stably lifting an object, we capture the motion of the entire body and adopt the generalized notion of "whole-body grasps". Thus, we collect a new dataset, called GRAB (GRasping Actions with Bodies), of whole-body grasps, containing full 3D shape and pose sequences of 10 subjects interacting with 51 everyday objects of varying shape and size. Given MoCap markers, we fit the full 3D body shape and pose, including the articulated face and hands, as well as the 3D object pose. This gives detailed 3D meshes over time, from which we compute contact between the body and object. This is a unique dataset, that goes well beyond existing ones for modeling and understanding how humans grasp and manipulate objects, how their full body is involved, and how interaction varies with the task. We illustrate the practical value of GRAB with an example application; we train GrabNet, a conditional generative network, to predict 3D hand grasps for unseen 3D object shapes. The dataset and code are available for research purposes at https://grab.is.tue.mpg.de.

pdf suppl video (long) video (short) link (url) DOI [BibTex]

pdf suppl video (long) video (short) link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Analysis of motor development within the first year of life: 3-{D} motion tracking without markers for early detection of developmental disorders
Analysis of motor development within the first year of life: 3-D motion tracking without markers for early detection of developmental disorders

Parisi, C., Hesse, N., Tacke, U., Rocamora, S. P., Blaschek, A., Hadders-Algra, M., Black, M. J., Heinen, F., Müller-Felber, W., Schroeder, A. S.

Bundesgesundheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Gesundheitsschutz, 63, pages: 881–890, July 2020 (article)

Abstract
Children with motor development disorders benefit greatly from early interventions. An early diagnosis in pediatric preventive care (U2–U5) can be improved by automated screening. Current approaches to automated motion analysis, however, are expensive, require lots of technical support, and cannot be used in broad clinical application. Here we present an inexpensive, marker-free video analysis tool (KineMAT) for infants, which digitizes 3‑D movements of the entire body over time allowing automated analysis in the future. Three-minute video sequences of spontaneously moving infants were recorded with a commercially available depth-imaging camera and aligned with a virtual infant body model (SMIL model). The virtual image generated allows any measurements to be carried out in 3‑D with high precision. We demonstrate seven infants with different diagnoses. A selection of possible movement parameters was quantified and aligned with diagnosis-specific movement characteristics. KineMAT and the SMIL model allow reliable, three-dimensional measurements of spontaneous activity in infants with a very low error rate. Based on machine-learning algorithms, KineMAT can be trained to automatically recognize pathological spontaneous motor skills. It is inexpensive and easy to use and can be developed into a screening tool for preventive care for children.

pdf on-line w/ sup mat DOI [BibTex]

pdf on-line w/ sup mat DOI [BibTex]


Learning to Dress 3D People in Generative Clothing
Learning to Dress 3D People in Generative Clothing

Ma, Q., Yang, J., Ranjan, A., Pujades, S., Pons-Moll, G., Tang, S., Black, M. J.

In Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), pages: 6468-6477, IEEE, June 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Three-dimensional human body models are widely used in the analysis of human pose and motion. Existing models, however, are learned from minimally-clothed 3D scans and thus do not generalize to the complexity of dressed people in common images and videos. Additionally, current models lack the expressive power needed to represent the complex non-linear geometry of pose-dependent clothing shape. To address this, we learn a generative 3D mesh model of clothed people from 3D scans with varying pose and clothing. Specifically, we train a conditional Mesh-VAE-GAN to learn the clothing deformation from the SMPL body model, making clothing an additional term on SMPL. Our model is conditioned on both pose and clothing type, giving the ability to draw samples of clothing to dress different body shapes in a variety of styles and poses. To preserve wrinkle detail, our Mesh-VAE-GAN extends patchwise discriminators to 3D meshes. Our model, named CAPE, represents global shape and fine local structure, effectively extending the SMPL body model to clothing. To our knowledge, this is the first generative model that directly dresses 3D human body meshes and generalizes to different poses.

Project page Code Short video Long video arXiv DOI [BibTex]

Project page Code Short video Long video arXiv DOI [BibTex]


{GENTEL : GENerating Training data Efficiently for Learning to segment medical images}
GENTEL : GENerating Training data Efficiently for Learning to segment medical images

Thakur, R. P., Rocamora, S. P., Goel, L., Pohmann, R., Machann, J., Black, M. J.

Congrès Reconnaissance des Formes, Image, Apprentissage et Perception (RFAIP), June 2020 (conference)

Abstract
Accurately segmenting MRI images is crucial for many clinical applications. However, manually segmenting images with accurate pixel precision is a tedious and time consuming task. In this paper we present a simple, yet effective method to improve the efficiency of the image segmentation process. We propose to transform the image annotation task into a binary choice task. We start by using classical image processing algorithms with different parameter values to generate multiple, different segmentation masks for each input MRI image. Then, instead of segmenting the pixels of the images, the user only needs to decide whether a segmentation is acceptable or not. This method allows us to efficiently obtain high quality segmentations with minor human intervention. With the selected segmentations, we train a state-of-the-art neural network model. For the evaluation, we use a second MRI dataset (1.5T Dataset), acquired with a different protocol and containing annotations. We show that the trained network i) is able to automatically segment cases where none of the classical methods obtain a high quality result ; ii) generalizes to the second MRI dataset, which was acquired with a different protocol and was never seen at training time ; and iii) enables detection of miss-annotations in this second dataset. Quantitatively, the trained network obtains very good results: DICE score - mean 0.98, median 0.99- and Hausdorff distance (in pixels) - mean 4.7, median 2.0-.

Project Page PDF [BibTex]

Project Page PDF [BibTex]


Generating 3D People in Scenes without People
Generating 3D People in Scenes without People

Zhang, Y., Hassan, M., Neumann, H., Black, M. J., Tang, S.

In Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), pages: 6194-6204, June 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a fully automatic system that takes a 3D scene and generates plausible 3D human bodies that are posed naturally in that 3D scene. Given a 3D scene without people, humans can easily imagine how people could interact with the scene and the objects in it. However, this is a challenging task for a computer as solving it requires that (1) the generated human bodies to be semantically plausible within the 3D environment (e.g. people sitting on the sofa or cooking near the stove), and (2) the generated human-scene interaction to be physically feasible such that the human body and scene do not interpenetrate while, at the same time, body-scene contact supports physical interactions. To that end, we make use of the surface-based 3D human model SMPL-X. We first train a conditional variational autoencoder to predict semantically plausible 3D human poses conditioned on latent scene representations, then we further refine the generated 3D bodies using scene constraints to enforce feasible physical interaction. We show that our approach is able to synthesize realistic and expressive 3D human bodies that naturally interact with 3D environment. We perform extensive experiments demonstrating that our generative framework compares favorably with existing methods, both qualitatively and quantitatively. We believe that our scene-conditioned 3D human generation pipeline will be useful for numerous applications; e.g. to generate training data for human pose estimation, in video games and in VR/AR. Our project page for data and code can be seen at: \url{https://vlg.inf.ethz.ch/projects/PSI/}.

Code PDF DOI [BibTex]

Code PDF DOI [BibTex]


Learning Physics-guided Face Relighting under Directional Light
Learning Physics-guided Face Relighting under Directional Light

Nestmeyer, T., Lalonde, J., Matthews, I., Lehrmann, A. M.

In Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, pages: 5123-5132, IEEE/CVF, June 2020 (inproceedings) Accepted

Abstract
Relighting is an essential step in realistically transferring objects from a captured image into another environment. For example, authentic telepresence in Augmented Reality requires faces to be displayed and relit consistent with the observer's scene lighting. We investigate end-to-end deep learning architectures that both de-light and relight an image of a human face. Our model decomposes the input image into intrinsic components according to a diffuse physics-based image formation model. We enable non-diffuse effects including cast shadows and specular highlights by predicting a residual correction to the diffuse render. To train and evaluate our model, we collected a portrait database of 21 subjects with various expressions and poses. Each sample is captured in a controlled light stage setup with 32 individual light sources. Our method creates precise and believable relighting results and generalizes to complex illumination conditions and challenging poses, including when the subject is not looking straight at the camera.

Paper [BibTex]

Paper [BibTex]


Learning and Tracking the {3D} Body Shape of Freely Moving Infants from {RGB-D} sequences
Learning and Tracking the 3D Body Shape of Freely Moving Infants from RGB-D sequences

Hesse, N., Pujades, S., Black, M., Arens, M., Hofmann, U., Schroeder, S.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (TPAMI), 42(10):2540-2551, 2020 (article)

Abstract
Statistical models of the human body surface are generally learned from thousands of high-quality 3D scans in predefined poses to cover the wide variety of human body shapes and articulations. Acquisition of such data requires expensive equipment, calibration procedures, and is limited to cooperative subjects who can understand and follow instructions, such as adults. We present a method for learning a statistical 3D Skinned Multi-Infant Linear body model (SMIL) from incomplete, low-quality RGB-D sequences of freely moving infants. Quantitative experiments show that SMIL faithfully represents the RGB-D data and properly factorizes the shape and pose of the infants. To demonstrate the applicability of SMIL, we fit the model to RGB-D sequences of freely moving infants and show, with a case study, that our method captures enough motion detail for General Movements Assessment (GMA), a method used in clinical practice for early detection of neurodevelopmental disorders in infants. SMIL provides a new tool for analyzing infant shape and movement and is a step towards an automated system for GMA.

pdf Journal DOI [BibTex]

pdf Journal DOI [BibTex]


{VIBE}: Video Inference for Human Body Pose and Shape Estimation
VIBE: Video Inference for Human Body Pose and Shape Estimation

Kocabas, M., Athanasiou, N., Black, M. J.

In Proceedings IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), pages: 5252-5262, IEEE, June 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Human motion is fundamental to understanding behavior. Despite progress on single-image 3D pose and shape estimation, existing video-based state-of-the-art methodsfail to produce accurate and natural motion sequences due to a lack of ground-truth 3D motion data for training. To address this problem, we propose “Video Inference for Body Pose and Shape Estimation” (VIBE), which makes use of an existing large-scale motion capture dataset (AMASS) together with unpaired, in-the-wild, 2D keypoint annotations. Our key novelty is an adversarial learning framework that leverages AMASS to discriminate between real human motions and those produced by our temporal pose and shape regression networks. We define a temporal network architecture and show that adversarial training, at the sequence level, produces kinematically plausible motion sequences without in-the-wild ground-truth 3D labels. We perform extensive experimentation to analyze the importance of motion and demonstrate the effectiveness of VIBE on challenging 3D pose estimation datasets, achieving state-of-the-art performance. Code and pretrained models are available at https://github.com/mkocabas/VIBE

arXiv code video supplemental video DOI Project Page [BibTex]

arXiv code video supplemental video DOI Project Page [BibTex]


General Movement Assessment from videos of computed {3D} infant body models is equally effective compared to conventional {RGB} Video rating
General Movement Assessment from videos of computed 3D infant body models is equally effective compared to conventional RGB Video rating

Schroeder, S., Hesse, N., Weinberger, R., Tacke, U., Gerstl, L., Hilgendorff, A., Heinen, F., Arens, M., Bodensteiner, C., Dijkstra, L. J., Pujades, S., Black, M., Hadders-Algra, M.

Early Human Development, 144, May 2020 (article)

Abstract
Background: General Movement Assessment (GMA) is a powerful tool to predict Cerebral Palsy (CP). Yet, GMA requires substantial training hampering its implementation in clinical routine. This inspired a world-wide quest for automated GMA. Aim: To test whether a low-cost, marker-less system for three-dimensional motion capture from RGB depth sequences using a whole body infant model may serve as the basis for automated GMA. Study design: Clinical case study at an academic neurodevelopmental outpatient clinic. Subjects: Twenty-nine high-risk infants were recruited and assessed at their clinical follow-up at 2-4 month corrected age (CA). Their neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed regularly up to 12-31 months CA. Outcome measures: GMA according to Hadders-Algra by a masked GMA-expert of conventional and computed 3D body model (“SMIL motion”) videos of the same GMs. Agreement between both GMAs was assessed, and sensitivity and specificity of both methods to predict CP at ≥12 months CA. Results: The agreement of the two GMA ratings was substantial, with κ=0.66 for the classification of definitely abnormal (DA) GMs and an ICC of 0.887 (95% CI 0.762;0.947) for a more detailed GM-scoring. Five children were diagnosed with CP (four bilateral, one unilateral CP). The GMs of the child with unilateral CP were twice rated as mildly abnormal. DA-ratings of both videos predicted bilateral CP well: sensitivity 75% and 100%, specificity 88% and 92% for conventional and SMIL motion videos, respectively. Conclusions: Our computed infant 3D full body model is an attractive starting point for automated GMA in infants at risk of CP.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


Learning Multi-Human Optical Flow
Learning Multi-Human Optical Flow

Ranjan, A., Hoffmann, D. T., Tzionas, D., Tang, S., Romero, J., Black, M. J.

International Journal of Computer Vision (IJCV), (128):873-890, April 2020 (article)

Abstract
The optical flow of humans is well known to be useful for the analysis of human action. Recent optical flow methods focus on training deep networks to approach the problem. However, the training data used by them does not cover the domain of human motion. Therefore, we develop a dataset of multi-human optical flow and train optical flow networks on this dataset. We use a 3D model of the human body and motion capture data to synthesize realistic flow fields in both single-and multi-person images. We then train optical flow networks to estimate human flow fields from pairs of images. We demonstrate that our trained networks are more accurate than a wide range of top methods on held-out test data and that they can generalize well to real image sequences. The code, trained models and the dataset are available for research.

pdf DOI poster link (url) DOI [BibTex]

pdf DOI poster link (url) DOI [BibTex]


From Variational to Deterministic Autoencoders
From Variational to Deterministic Autoencoders

Ghosh*, P., Sajjadi*, M. S. M., Vergari, A., Black, M. J., Schölkopf, B.

8th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR) , April 2020, *equal contribution (conference)

Abstract
Variational Autoencoders (VAEs) provide a theoretically-backed framework for deep generative models. However, they often produce “blurry” images, which is linked to their training objective. Sampling in the most popular implementation, the Gaussian VAE, can be interpreted as simply injecting noise to the input of a deterministic decoder. In practice, this simply enforces a smooth latent space structure. We challenge the adoption of the full VAE framework on this specific point in favor of a simpler, deterministic one. Specifically, we investigate how substituting stochasticity with other explicit and implicit regularization schemes can lead to a meaningful latent space without having to force it to conform to an arbitrarily chosen prior. To retrieve a generative mechanism for sampling new data points, we propose to employ an efficient ex-post density estimation step that can be readily adopted both for the proposed deterministic autoencoders as well as to improve sample quality of existing VAEs. We show in a rigorous empirical study that regularized deterministic autoencoding achieves state-of-the-art sample quality on the common MNIST, CIFAR-10 and CelebA datasets.

arXiv link (url) [BibTex]

arXiv link (url) [BibTex]


Attractiveness and Confidence in Walking Style of Male and Female Virtual Characters
Attractiveness and Confidence in Walking Style of Male and Female Virtual Characters

Thaler, A., Bieg, A., Mahmood, N., Black, M. J., Mohler, B. J., Troje, N. F.

In IEEE Conference on Virtual Reality and 3D User Interfaces Abstracts and Workshops (VRW), pages: 678-679, March 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Animated virtual characters are essential to many applications. Little is known so far about biological and personality inferences made from a virtual character’s body shape and motion. Here, we investigated how sex-specific differences in walking style relate to the perceived attractiveness and confidence of male and female virtual characters. The characters were generated by reconstructing body shape and walking motion from optical motion capture data. The results suggest that sexual dimorphism in walking style plays a different role in attributing biological and personality traits to male and female virtual characters. This finding has important implications for virtual character animation.

pdf DOI [BibTex]

pdf DOI [BibTex]


Chained Representation Cycling: Learning to Estimate 3D Human Pose and Shape by Cycling Between Representations
Chained Representation Cycling: Learning to Estimate 3D Human Pose and Shape by Cycling Between Representations

Rueegg, N., Lassner, C., Black, M. J., Schindler, K.

In Thirty-Fourth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-20), pages: 5561-5569, Febuary 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of many computer vision systems is to transform image pixels into 3D representations. Recent popular models use neural networks to regress directly from pixels to 3D object parameters. Such an approach works well when supervision is available, but in problems like human pose and shape estimation, it is difficult to obtain natural images with 3D ground truth. To go one step further, we propose a new architecture that facilitates unsupervised, or lightly supervised, learning. The idea is to break the problem into a series of transformations between increasingly abstract representations. Each step involves a cycle designed to be learnable without annotated training data, and the chain of cycles delivers the final solution. Specifically, we use 2D body part segments as an intermediate representation that contains enough information to be lifted to 3D, and at the same time is simple enough to be learned in an unsupervised way. We demonstrate the method by learning 3D human pose and shape from un-paired and un-annotated images. We also explore varying amounts of paired data and show that cycling greatly alleviates the need for paired data. While we present results for modeling humans, our formulation is general and can be applied to other vision problems.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Machine learning systems and methods for augmenting images
Machine learning systems and methods for augmenting images

Black, M., Rachlin, E., Lee, E., Heron, N., Loper, M., Weiss, A., Smith, D.

(US Patent 10,529,137 B1), January 2020 (patent)

Abstract
Disclosed is a method including receiving visual input comprising a human within a scene, detecting a pose associated with the human using a trained machine learning model that detects human poses to yield a first output, estimating a shape (and optionally a motion) associated with the human using a trained machine learning model associated that detects shape (and optionally motion) to yield a second output, recognizing the scene associated with the visual input using a trained convolutional neural network which determines information about the human and other objects in the scene to yield a third output, and augmenting reality within the scene by leveraging one or more of the first output, the second output, and the third output to place 2D and/or 3D graphics in the scene.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Real Time Trajectory Prediction Using Deep Conditional Generative Models
Real Time Trajectory Prediction Using Deep Conditional Generative Models

Gomez-Gonzalez, S., Prokudin, S., Schölkopf, B., Peters, J.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, 5(2):970-976, IEEE, January 2020 (article)

arXiv DOI [BibTex]

2008


Learning Optical Flow
Learning Optical Flow

Sun, D., Roth, S., Lewis, J., Black, M. J.

In European Conf. on Computer Vision, ECCV, 5304, pages: 83-97, LNCS, (Editors: Forsyth, D. and Torr, P. and Zisserman, A.), Springer-Verlag, October 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Assumptions of brightness constancy and spatial smoothness underlie most optical flow estimation methods. In contrast to standard heuristic formulations, we learn a statistical model of both brightness constancy error and the spatial properties of optical flow using image sequences with associated ground truth flow fields. The result is a complete probabilistic model of optical flow. Specifically, the ground truth enables us to model how the assumption of brightness constancy is violated in naturalistic sequences, resulting in a probabilistic model of "brightness inconstancy". We also generalize previous high-order constancy assumptions, such as gradient constancy, by modeling the constancy of responses to various linear filters in a high-order random field framework. These filters are free variables that can be learned from training data. Additionally we study the spatial structure of the optical flow and how motion boundaries are related to image intensity boundaries. Spatial smoothness is modeled using a Steerable Random Field, where spatial derivatives of the optical flow are steered by the image brightness structure. These models provide a statistical motivation for previous methods and enable the learning of all parameters from training data. All proposed models are quantitatively compared on the Middlebury flow dataset.

pdf Springerlink version [BibTex]

2008

pdf Springerlink version [BibTex]


GNU Octave Manual Version 3
GNU Octave Manual Version 3

John W. Eaton, David Bateman, Soren Hauberg

Network Theory Ltd., October 2008 (book)

Publishers site GNU Octave [BibTex]

Publishers site GNU Octave [BibTex]


no image
Probabilistic Roadmap Method and Real Time Gait Changing Technique Implementation for Travel Time Optimization on a Designed Six-legged Robot

Ahmad, A., Dhang, N.

In pages: 1-5, October 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper presents design and development of a six legged robot with a total of 12 degrees of freedom, two in each limb and then an implementation of 'obstacle and undulated terrain-based' probabilistic roadmap method for motion planning of this hexaped which is able to negotiate large undulations as obstacles. The novelty in this implementation is that, it doesnt require the complete view of the robot's configuration space at any given time during the traversal. It generates a map of the area that is in visibility range and finds the best suitable point in that field of view to make it as the next node of the algorithm. A particular category of undulations which are small enough are automatically 'run-over' as a part of the terrain and not considered as obstacles. The traversal between the nodes is optimized by taking the shortest path and the most optimum gait at that instance which the hexaped can assume. This is again a novel approach to have a real time gait changing technique to optimize the travel time. The hexaped limb can swing in the robot's X-Y plane and the lower link of the limb can move in robot's Z plane by an implementation of a four-bar mechanism. A GUI based server 'Yellow Ladybird' eventually which is the name of the hexaped, is made for real time monitoring and communicating to it the final destination co-ordinates.

link (url) [BibTex]


The naked truth: Estimating body shape under clothing,
The naked truth: Estimating body shape under clothing,

Balan, A., Black, M. J.

In European Conf. on Computer Vision, ECCV, 5304, pages: 15-29, LNCS, (Editors: D. Forsyth and P. Torr and A. Zisserman), Springer-Verlag, Marseilles, France, October 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose a method to estimate the detailed 3D shape of a person from images of that person wearing clothing. The approach exploits a model of human body shapes that is learned from a database of over 2000 range scans. We show that the parameters of this shape model can be recovered independently of body pose. We further propose a generalization of the visual hull to account for the fact that observed silhouettes of clothed people do not provide a tight bound on the true 3D shape. With clothed subjects, different poses provide different constraints on the possible underlying 3D body shape. We consequently combine constraints across pose to more accurately estimate 3D body shape in the presence of occluding clothing. Finally we use the recovered 3D shape to estimate the gender of subjects and then employ gender-specific body models to refine our shape estimates. Results on a novel database of thousands of images of clothed and "naked" subjects, as well as sequences from the HumanEva dataset, suggest the method may be accurate enough for biometric shape analysis in video.

pdf pdf with higher quality images Springerlink version YouTube video on applications data slides [BibTex]

pdf pdf with higher quality images Springerlink version YouTube video on applications data slides [BibTex]


Infinite Kernel Learning
Infinite Kernel Learning

Gehler, P., Nowozin, S.

(178), Max Planck Institute, octomber 2008 (techreport)

project page pdf [BibTex]

project page pdf [BibTex]


A non-parametric {Bayesian} alternative to spike sorting
A non-parametric Bayesian alternative to spike sorting

Wood, F., Black, M. J.

J. Neuroscience Methods, 173(1):1–12, August 2008 (article)

Abstract
The analysis of extra-cellular neural recordings typically begins with careful spike sorting and all analysis of the data then rests on the correctness of the resulting spike trains. In many situations this is unproblematic as experimental and spike sorting procedures often focus on well isolated units. There is evidence in the literature, however, that errors in spike sorting can occur even with carefully collected and selected data. Additionally, chronically implanted electrodes and arrays with fixed electrodes cannot be easily adjusted to provide well isolated units. In these situations, multiple units may be recorded and the assignment of waveforms to units may be ambiguous. At the same time, analysis of such data may be both scientifically important and clinically relevant. In this paper we address this issue using a novel probabilistic model that accounts for several important sources of uncertainty and error in spike sorting. In lieu of sorting neural data to produce a single best spike train, we estimate a probabilistic model of spike trains given the observed data. We show how such a distribution over spike sortings can support standard neuroscientific questions while providing a representation of uncertainty in the analysis. As a representative illustration of the approach, we analyzed primary motor cortical tuning with respect to hand movement in data recorded with a chronic multi-electrode array in non-human primates.We found that the probabilistic analysis generally agrees with human sorters but suggests the presence of tuned units not detected by humans.

pdf preprint pdf from publisher PubMed [BibTex]

pdf preprint pdf from publisher PubMed [BibTex]


Dynamic time warping for binocular hand tracking and reconstruction
Dynamic time warping for binocular hand tracking and reconstruction

Romero, J., Kragic, D., Kyrki, V., Argyros, A.

In IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation,ICRA, pages: 2289 -2294, May 2008 (inproceedings)

Pdf [BibTex]

Pdf [BibTex]


Neural control of computer cursor velocity by decoding motor cortical spiking activity in humans with tetraplegia
Neural control of computer cursor velocity by decoding motor cortical spiking activity in humans with tetraplegia

(J. Neural Engineering Highlights of 2008 Collection)

Kim, S., Simeral, J., Hochberg, L., Donoghue, J. P., Black, M. J.

J. Neural Engineering, 5, pages: 455–476, 2008 (article)

Abstract
Computer-mediated connections between human motor cortical neurons and assistive devices promise to improve or restore lost function in people with paralysis. Recently, a pilot clinical study of an intracortical neural interface system demonstrated that a tetraplegic human was able to obtain continuous two-dimensional control of a computer cursor using neural activity recorded from his motor cortex. This control, however, was not sufficiently accurate for reliable use in many common computer control tasks. Here, we studied several central design choices for such a system including the kinematic representation for cursor movement, the decoding method that translates neuronal ensemble spiking activity into a control signal and the cursor control task used during training for optimizing the parameters of the decoding method. In two tetraplegic participants, we found that controlling a cursor’s velocity resulted in more accurate closed-loop control than controlling its position directly and that cursor velocity control was achieved more rapidly than position control. Control quality was further improved over conventional linear filters by using a probabilistic method, the Kalman filter, to decode human motor cortical activity. Performance assessment based on standard metrics used for the evaluation of a wide range of pointing devices demonstrated significantly improved cursor control with velocity rather than position decoding.

pdf preprint pdf from publisher [BibTex]

pdf preprint pdf from publisher [BibTex]


Incremental nonparametric {Bayesian} regression
Incremental nonparametric Bayesian regression

Wood, F., Grollman, D. H., Heller, K. A., Jenkins, O. C., Black, M. J.

(CS-08-07), Brown University, Department of Computer Science, 2008 (techreport)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Brownian Warps for Non-Rigid Registration
Brownian Warps for Non-Rigid Registration

Mads Nielsen, Peter Johansen, Andrew Jackson, Benny Lautrup, Soren Hauberg

Journal of Mathematical Imaging and Vision, 31, pages: 221-231, Springer Netherlands, 2008 (article)

Publishers site PDF [BibTex]

Publishers site PDF [BibTex]


Simultaneous Visual Recognition of Manipulation Actions and Manipulated Objects
Simultaneous Visual Recognition of Manipulation Actions and Manipulated Objects

Kjellström, H., Romero, J., Martinez, D., Kragic, D.

In European Conference on Computer Vision, ECCV, pages: 336-349, 2008 (inproceedings)

Pdf [BibTex]

Pdf [BibTex]


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Tuning analysis of motor cortical neurons in a person with paralysis during performance of visually instructed cursor control tasks

Kim, S., Simeral, J. D., Hochberg, L. R., Truccolo, W., Donoghue, J., Friehs, G. M., Black, M. J.

2008 Abstract Viewer and Itinerary Planner, Society for Neuroscience, Washington, DC, 2008, Online (conference)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Infinite Kernel Learning
Infinite Kernel Learning

Gehler, P., Nowozin, S.

In Proceedings of NIPS 2008 Workshop on "Kernel Learning: Automatic Selection of Optimal Kernels", 2008 (inproceedings)

project page pdf [BibTex]

project page pdf [BibTex]


 An Efficient Algorithm for Modelling Duration in Hidden Markov Models, with a Dramatic Application
An Efficient Algorithm for Modelling Duration in Hidden Markov Models, with a Dramatic Application

Soren Hauberg, Jakob Sloth

Journal of Mathematical Imaging and Vision, 31, pages: 165-170, Springer Netherlands, 2008 (article)

Publishers site Paper site PDF [BibTex]

Publishers site Paper site PDF [BibTex]


Visual Recognition of Grasps for Human-to-Robot Mapping
Visual Recognition of Grasps for Human-to-Robot Mapping

Kjellström, H., Romero, J., Kragic, D.

In IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS, pages: 3192-3199, 2008 (inproceedings)

Pdf [BibTex]

Pdf [BibTex]


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More than two years of intracortically-based cursor control via a neural interface system

Hochberg, L. R., Simeral, J. D., Kim, S., Stein, J., Friehs, G. M., Black, M. J., Donoghue, J. P.

2008 Abstract Viewer and Itinerary Planner, Society for Neuroscience, Washington, DC, 2008, Online (conference)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Decoding of reach and grasp from MI population spiking activity using a low-dimensional model of hand and arm posture

Yadollahpour, P., Shakhnarovich, G., Vargas-Irwin, C., Donoghue, J. P., Black, M. J.

2008 Abstract Viewer and Itinerary Planner, Society for Neuroscience, Washington, DC, 2008, Online (conference)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Neural activity in the motor cortex of humans with tetraplegia

Donoghue, J., Simeral, J., Black, M., Kim, S., Truccolo, W., Hochberg, L.

AREADNE Research in Encoding And Decoding of Neural Ensembles, June, Santorini, Greece, 2008 (conference)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Combined discriminative and generative articulated pose and non-rigid shape estimation
Combined discriminative and generative articulated pose and non-rigid shape estimation

Sigal, L., Balan, A., Black, M. J.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 20, NIPS-2007, pages: 1337–1344, MIT Press, 2008 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


no image
Reconstructing reach and grasp actions using neural population activity from Primary Motor Cortex

Vargas-Irwin, C. E., Yadollahpour, P., Shakhnarovich, G., Black, M. J., Donoghue, J. P.

2008 Abstract Viewer and Itinerary Planner, Society for Neuroscience, Washington, DC, 2008, Online (conference)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


Nonrigid Structure from Motion in Trajectory Space
Nonrigid Structure from Motion in Trajectory Space

Akhter, I., Sheikh, Y., Khan, S., Kanade, T.

In Neural Information Processing Systems, 1(2):41-48, 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Existing approaches to nonrigid structure from motion assume that the instantaneous 3D shape of a deforming object is a linear combination of basis shapes, which have to be estimated anew for each video sequence. In contrast, we propose that the evolving 3D structure be described by a linear combination of basis trajectories. The principal advantage of this approach is that we do not need to estimate any basis vectors during computation. We show that generic bases over trajectories, such as the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) basis, can be used to compactly describe most real motions. This results in a significant reduction in unknowns, and corresponding stability in estimation. We report empirical performance, quantitatively using motion capture data, and qualitatively on several video sequences exhibiting nonrigid motions including piece-wise rigid motion, partially nonrigid motion (such as a facial expression), and highly nonrigid motion (such as a person dancing).

pdf project page [BibTex]

pdf project page [BibTex]

2003


Image statistics and anisotropic diffusion
Image statistics and anisotropic diffusion

Scharr, H., Black, M. J., Haussecker, H.

In Int. Conf. on Computer Vision, pages: 840-847, October 2003 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

2003

pdf [BibTex]


A switching {Kalman} filter model for the motor cortical coding of hand motion
A switching Kalman filter model for the motor cortical coding of hand motion

Wu, W., Black, M. J., Mumford, D., Gao, Y., Bienenstock, E., Donoghue, J. P.

In Proc. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, pages: 2083-2086, September 2003 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Learning the statistics of people in images and video
Learning the statistics of people in images and video

Sidenbladh, H., Black, M. J.

International Journal of Computer Vision, 54(1-3):183-209, August 2003 (article)

Abstract
This paper address the problems of modeling the appearance of humans and distinguishing human appearance from the appearance of general scenes. We seek a model of appearance and motion that is generic in that it accounts for the ways in which people's appearance varies and, at the same time, is specific enough to be useful for tracking people in natural scenes. Given a 3D model of the person projected into an image we model the likelihood of observing various image cues conditioned on the predicted locations and orientations of the limbs. These cues are taken to be steered filter responses corresponding to edges, ridges, and motion-compensated temporal differences. Motivated by work on the statistics of natural scenes, the statistics of these filter responses for human limbs are learned from training images containing hand-labeled limb regions. Similarly, the statistics of the filter responses in general scenes are learned to define a “background” distribution. The likelihood of observing a scene given a predicted pose of a person is computed, for each limb, using the likelihood ratio between the learned foreground (person) and background distributions. Adopting a Bayesian formulation allows cues to be combined in a principled way. Furthermore, the use of learned distributions obviates the need for hand-tuned image noise models and thresholds. The paper provides a detailed analysis of the statistics of how people appear in scenes and provides a connection between work on natural image statistics and the Bayesian tracking of people.

pdf pdf from publisher code DOI [BibTex]

pdf pdf from publisher code DOI [BibTex]


A framework for robust subspace learning
A framework for robust subspace learning

De la Torre, F., Black, M. J.

International Journal of Computer Vision, 54(1-3):117-142, August 2003 (article)

Abstract
Many computer vision, signal processing and statistical problems can be posed as problems of learning low dimensional linear or multi-linear models. These models have been widely used for the representation of shape, appearance, motion, etc., in computer vision applications. Methods for learning linear models can be seen as a special case of subspace fitting. One draw-back of previous learning methods is that they are based on least squares estimation techniques and hence fail to account for “outliers” which are common in realistic training sets. We review previous approaches for making linear learning methods robust to outliers and present a new method that uses an intra-sample outlier process to account for pixel outliers. We develop the theory of Robust Subspace Learning (RSL) for linear models within a continuous optimization framework based on robust M-estimation. The framework applies to a variety of linear learning problems in computer vision including eigen-analysis and structure from motion. Several synthetic and natural examples are used to develop and illustrate the theory and applications of robust subspace learning in computer vision.

pdf code pdf from publisher Project Page [BibTex]

pdf code pdf from publisher Project Page [BibTex]


Guest editorial: Computational vision at {Brown}
Guest editorial: Computational vision at Brown

Black, M. J., Kimia, B.

International Journal of Computer Vision, 54(1-3):5-11, August 2003 (article)

pdf pdf from publisher [BibTex]

pdf pdf from publisher [BibTex]


Robust parameterized component analysis: Theory and applications to {2D} facial appearance models
Robust parameterized component analysis: Theory and applications to 2D facial appearance models

De la Torre, F., Black, M. J.

Computer Vision and Image Understanding, 91(1-2):53-71, July 2003 (article)

Abstract
Principal component analysis (PCA) has been successfully applied to construct linear models of shape, graylevel, and motion in images. In particular, PCA has been widely used to model the variation in the appearance of people's faces. We extend previous work on facial modeling for tracking faces in video sequences as they undergo significant changes due to facial expressions. Here we consider person-specific facial appearance models (PSFAM), which use modular PCA to model complex intra-person appearance changes. Such models require aligned visual training data; in previous work, this has involved a time consuming and error-prone hand alignment and cropping process. Instead, the main contribution of this paper is to introduce parameterized component analysis to learn a subspace that is invariant to affine (or higher order) geometric transformations. The automatic learning of a PSFAM given a training image sequence is posed as a continuous optimization problem and is solved with a mixture of stochastic and deterministic techniques achieving sub-pixel accuracy. We illustrate the use of the 2D PSFAM model with preliminary experiments relevant to applications including video-conferencing and avatar animation.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]