Header logo is ps


2020


Chained Representation Cycling: Learning to Estimate 3D Human Pose and Shape by Cycling Between Representations
Chained Representation Cycling: Learning to Estimate 3D Human Pose and Shape by Cycling Between Representations

Rueegg, N., Lassner, C., Black, M. J., Schindler, K.

In Thirty-Fourth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-20), Febuary 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of many computer vision systems is to transform image pixels into 3D representations. Recent popular models use neural networks to regress directly from pixels to 3D object parameters. Such an approach works well when supervision is available, but in problems like human pose and shape estimation, it is difficult to obtain natural images with 3D ground truth. To go one step further, we propose a new architecture that facilitates unsupervised, or lightly supervised, learning. The idea is to break the problem into a series of transformations between increasingly abstract representations. Each step involves a cycle designed to be learnable without annotated training data, and the chain of cycles delivers the final solution. Specifically, we use 2D body part segments as an intermediate representation that contains enough information to be lifted to 3D, and at the same time is simple enough to be learned in an unsupervised way. We demonstrate the method by learning 3D human pose and shape from un-paired and un-annotated images. We also explore varying amounts of paired data and show that cycling greatly alleviates the need for paired data. While we present results for modeling humans, our formulation is general and can be applied to other vision problems.

pdf [BibTex]

2020

pdf [BibTex]

1996


Cardboard people: A parameterized model of articulated motion
Cardboard people: A parameterized model of articulated motion

Ju, S. X., Black, M. J., Yacoob, Y.

In 2nd Int. Conf. on Automatic Face- and Gesture-Recognition, pages: 38-44, Killington, Vermont, October 1996 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We extend the work of Black and Yacoob on the tracking and recognition of human facial expressions using parameterized models of optical flow to deal with the articulated motion of human limbs. We define a "cardboard person model" in which a person's limbs are represented by a set of connected planar patches. The parameterized image motion of these patches is constrained to enforce articulated motion and is solved for directly using a robust estimation technique. The recovered motion parameters provide a rich and concise description of the activity that can be used for recognition. We propose a method for performing view-based recognition of human activities from the optical flow parameters that extends previous methods to cope with the cyclical nature of human motion. We illustrate the method with examples of tracking human legs over long image sequences.

pdf [BibTex]

1996

pdf [BibTex]


Skin and Bones: Multi-layer, locally affine, optical flow and regularization with transparency
Skin and Bones: Multi-layer, locally affine, optical flow and regularization with transparency

(Nominated: Best paper)

Ju, S., Black, M. J., Jepson, A. D.

In IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR’96, pages: 307-314, San Francisco, CA, June 1996 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


EigenTracking: Robust matching and tracking of articulated objects using a view-based representation
EigenTracking: Robust matching and tracking of articulated objects using a view-based representation

Black, M. J., Jepson, A.

In Proc. Fourth European Conf. on Computer Vision, ECCV’96, pages: 329-342, LNCS 1064, Springer Verlag, Cambridge, England, April 1996 (inproceedings)

pdf video [BibTex]

pdf video [BibTex]